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Washington University Film & Media Archive

Eyes on the Prize II: America at the Racial Crossroads 1965-1985

Eyes on the Prize Interviews: The Complete Series

Eyes on the Prize II: America at the Racial Crossroads 1965-1985 Interviewees

All of the interviews from Eyes on the Prize I and II are available online with full text search capability. Eyes on the Prize is a 14-part series which was originally released in two parts in 1987 and 1990. This series, which debuted on PBS stations, is considered to be the definitive documentary on the Civil Rights Movement. Eyes on the Prize won more than twenty major awards and attracted over 20 million viewers. These interviews are part of the Henry Hampton Collection housed at the Film and Media Archive at Washington University Libraries. Each transcript represents the entire interview conducted by Blackside including sections which appeared in the final program and the outtakes. This project is part of Washington University's Digital Gateway and was produced by Digital Library Services and the Film and Media Archive.

Eyes on the Prize II: America at the Racial Crossroads 1965-1985 Subject Index (pdf file)

Through historical footage and contemporary interviews these eight hour-long programs examine the triumphs and failures of individuals and communities eager to give flesh to the movement's hard-won gains. The series also probes the transition to a more challenging time in this country's social history.

Eyes on the Prize II takes viewers from the streets of Malcolm X's Harlem to Oakland and the birth of the Black Panthers; from the frustrations of rioters in Detroit and Miami to the victory celebration for Harold Washington, Chicago's first black mayor; from ringside with Muhammad Ali to the "Mountain Top" speech of Martin Luther King on the eve of his assassination.

The Time Has Come (1964-1966) -- reveals a new ideology within the civil rights movement, the insistent call for power, as it gains popularity among black Americans. Malcolm X and the Nation of Islam strike a resonant chord in New York. Its echoes can be heard in the South, where the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) turns the call for "Freedom Now!" into one for "Black Power.

Key interviews:

In Two Societies (1965-1968) -- Martin Luther King and the Chicago Freedom Movement confront Mayor Daley's machine with mixed results in a battle against segregated housing in Chicago. Pent-up anger explodes in Detroit, where a week of clashes between slum residents and police leaves 43 dead. One Detroit resident recalls, "When my daughter got to church she called back and said, ‘Momma, it's Judgement Day…everything is burning.'"

Key interviews:

Power! (1966-1968) -- explores three paths taken to power. In Cleveland, voters elect Carl Stokes the city's first black mayor. The Black Panthers take up law books, breakfast programs, and guns in Oakland. For a time, parents win educational control of their public school district in Brooklyn.

Key interviews:

The Promised Land (1967-1968) -- charts Martin Luther King's often overlooked final year, from his declaration of opposition to the war in Vietnam, through the beginning of his Poor People's Campaign, to his 1968 assassination in Memphis. As Dr. King said shortly before his death, "This is America's opportunity to help bridge the gap between the haves and have-nots…but the real questions is whether we have the will."

Key interviews:

InAin't Gonna Shuffle No More (1964-1972) -- a new sense of black pride and black consciousness is evidenced by a prizefighter name Cassius Clay (a.k.a. Muhammad Ali), on the campus of Howard University in Washington, DC, and at the National Black Political Convention in Gary, Indiana. Harry Belafonte says of Ali, "[He] was the embodiment of the thrust of the movement…He didn't care about money. He didn't care about the white man's success…He brought America to its most wonderful and most naked moment. [He said] I will not play your game. I will not kill in your behalf."

Key interviews:

A Nation of Law? (1968-1971) -- reveals the sometimes violent and unethical measures that law enforcers used to answer black political demands. The program explores the killing of two Black Panther leaders in Chicago and the rebellion at New York's Attica state prison that left 43 dead.

Key interviews:

The Keys to the Kingdom (1974-1980) -- antidiscrimination laws are put to the test. Boston's schools are ordered to desegregate, but some whites resist violently. Affirmative Action scores a victory in Atlanta but is challenged with the Bakke Supreme Court case.

Key interviews:

Back to the Movement (1979-mid 1980s) -- In the Liberty City section of Miami, unrest follows the fatal shooting of a black citizen by the police. But in Chicago, an unprecedented grassroots crusade empowers the black community and takes Harold Washington to victory as the city's first black mayor. The series ends with a look back at the people who made this movement a force for change in America.

Key interviews:

Premiere: Monday, January 15, 1990 PBS