WU History

Aftermath of World War II at Washington University

By Karisa Tavassoli, WU Class 2016 on January 8, 2016

In 1942, people of Japanese heritage in the United States were forced into internment camps, for the duration of the war (WWII).  For Japanese youth, discussions about their college studies became a pertinent discussion among higher education institutions in the Mid-West. George Throop, who was C...

Speak Out! Writings About Women

By Karisa Tavassoli, WU Class 2016 on December 29, 2015

In 1985, the Women’s Studies Program (now known as the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Department) sponsored and published a booklet called Speaking Out: Writings about Women. This collection of essays ranges in topics from healthcare to harassment that relate to the struggle of women, including que...

April 11, 1965: Should we be in Selma?

By Karisa Tavassoli, WU Class 2016 on October 21, 2015

Below is an excerpt from the Grouch, a student publication directed by Residential Advisors, and now part of University Archives.  The article engages the racism in St. Louis, and questions what methods would be best in order to fight that racism. April 11, 1965 Should we be in Selma? By Mike Lun...

Whose History Is Being Told?

By Karisa Tavassoli, WU Class 2016 on October 7, 2015

Those of us who not only love history but work to preserve documents and peoples’ stories, must be aware of whose stories are being told and use access to information in a way that is always striving toward equity. The erasure of certain histories has long been a tool to oppress and de-value peop...

Social Work: History of the Brown School

By Karisa Tavassoli, WU Class 2016 on September 28, 2015

St. Louis School of Philanthropy was founded in 1904 as a response to the widespread poverty and health problems rising in St. Louis.  Ambrose P. Winston, an economics professor at Washington University published an article titled, Is it an Advantage to a University to be Placed in a City? In the...

Freshman Orientation: A Right of Passage

By Karisa Tavassoli, WU Class 2016 on August 24, 2015

It is a new year at Washington University! This means a new wave of students. A new wave of excitement, stress, social movements, ideas, and tensions. The beginning of the year is different for everyone. Faculty and staff who have been at Washington University for a long time know the drill. Risi...

St. Louis, Policing, and Racism : From the Desk of Dan Bolef

By Karisa Tavassoli, WU Class 2016 on August 5, 2015

Police brutality and violent acts of white supremacy against black people in America have come to the media’s attention with the growing awareness of the Black Lives Matter movement. One year ago on August 9, 2014 a police officer shot and killed Mike Brown, whose death became a rallying point fo...

Remembering Dr. Helen Nash

By Miranda Rectenwald on June 17, 2015

Remembering Helen Nash, MD – Pioneering African-American Physician From the Becker Archives, Washington University School of Medicine: Helen E. Nash challenged the racial status quo in St. Louis when she became the first African-American doctor to join the staff of St. Louis Children’s Hospital i...

The New Washington University

By Karisa Tavassoli, WU Class 2016 on June 10, 2015

It may be difficult to imagine the joy and excitement of the earliest professors, students, and board members when Washington University was founded in 1853. When the university moved in 1905 from the first downtown campus in the city of St. Louis to its current location near Forest Park, that en...

The WWI Diary of Captain Levi H. Fuson of Base Hospital 21

By Miranda Rectenwald on June 4, 2015

From Missouri Over There: Exploring Missouri’s Role in WWI: “In 1915, Levi H. Fuson was one of 29 to graduate from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. Of the 29 graduates, 24 went on to serve in World War I as commissioned medical officers. Fuson was t...