African-American

Impact HIV/AIDS Initiative Griot Museum

By Miranda Rectenwald on November 21, 2018

Washington University Libraries is one of several community partners joining The Griot Museum of Black History on the Impact HIV/AIDS Initiative — an arts and culture community awareness initiative  exploring the ongoing relationship between HIV/AIDS and the St. Louis region’s African-Ameri...

African American Newspapers–NEW DATABASE

By Array on July 19, 2018

African American Newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day, including the Mexican War, Presidential and Congressional addresses, Congressional abstracts, business and c...

Call for Nominations – 2018 Trailblazers Award

By Rose Miyatsu on February 5, 2018

  Kick off Black History Month by nominating someone for the Trailblazers award! Nominations will be accepted until February 15 at 5:00 pm. The Washington University Trailblazers was established in 2016 to acknowledge, commemorate and celebrate the contributions Black alumni, faculty and sta...

Health-Care Access for Low-Income People of Color and Pruitt-Igoe

By Karisa Tavassoli, WU Class of 2016 on June 3, 2016

The Pruitt-Igoe high-rise housing projects were developed in the 1950s as a response to slums and overcrowded living in the city of St. Louis and the flight of white middle-class families to the suburbs. However, the state neglected to maintain the buildings or provide services to the majority lo...

Remembering Dr. Helen Nash

By Miranda Rectenwald on June 17, 2015

Remembering Helen Nash, MD – Pioneering African-American Physician From the Becker Archives, Washington University School of Medicine: Helen E. Nash challenged the racial status quo in St. Louis when she became the first African-American doctor to join the staff of St. Louis Children’s Hospital i...

Black Position Paper, 1968

By Karisa Tavassoli, WU Class of 2016 on September 17, 2014

As you read the following, as yourself: How much has changed at WashU since 1968? How much has not changed? What can we do to keep improving the safety and equality of students at our school? Excerpts from the Black Position Paper, December 6, 1968: The following statement is issued by The Associ...

Beyond the 1960s: Documenting St. Louis’ Civil Rights History

By Miranda Rectenwald on January 17, 2013

While most American History textbooks focus on the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, in St. Louis (and in many parts of the US) the movement is much more complex. In recent years more historians have turned their attention to the years preceding and following the turbulent Sixties. Primarily due to th...