News and notes for biology, March 2017

What books (or journals or databases) do you need? Now would be an excellent time to submit requests while I still have funds available for books and ebooks this fiscal year. For very expensive titles and for journals and databases which require annual payments, I usually can’t order them immediately but I can add them to the “wish list” and/or consider replacing a low priority title with a higher priority title. Please email your requests to Ruth Lewis [ rlewis@wustl.edu ] or use the request forms from the library website, Recommend a purchase for the library collections (book, CD, DVD, other) OR Recommend a journal order or cancellation. Thank you!

Preprints still in the news: NIH Encourages Use of Preprints and Other Interim Research Products; see also NIH’s new embrace of preprints will be a boon to science on STAT.

Journal now available: Nature Human Behaviour, v.1, 2017+

Upcoming classes at Becker Medical Library:
NIH and Other Public Access Policies Are you preparing a manuscript arising from NIH-funded research? Do you have other sources of grant funding such as the American Heart Association or the Department of Defense? If so, you may be required to comply with public access policies issued by these organizations. This session will provide an overview of the NIH Public Access Policy and other public access policies including the steps involved with compliance. Friday April 14, 2017 Becker Library, Room 405, Noon to 1:00pm Registration.
NCBI My Bibliography: Live Demo Are you interested in learning more about NCBI My Bibliography? My Bibliography is a tool for managing citations and can be used to:
– complete a list of citations for articles and research products using PubMed
– track compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy
– generate a list of citations for a NIH biosketch
– populate the RPPR for reporting purposes
The session will start with a live demo of My Bibliography followed by a question/answer session. Feel free to bring your laptop to follow along with the demo or for troubleshooting. Friday April 21, 2017 Becker Library, Room 405, Noon to 1:00pm, Registration.
NIH Biosketch and NCBI SciENcv The session will review the instructions for creating a biosketch in the NIH format and include a review of NCBI SciENcv, a tool to generate a biosketch. Tuesday April 25, 2017 Farrell Learning and Teaching Center, Room 213, Noon to 1:00pm, Registration.

NCBI Minute: Setting Up Alerts for New Data in My NCBI (7:45 video) Many people use My NCBI alerts to be notified when new citations of interest appear in PubMed. But you can also set alerts for new datasets in the traditional sequence databases, as well as SRA and GEO.

#DataRescueWU Washington University Libraries is hosting a DataRescue hackathon to help preserve at-risk federal data. You may have seen press on similar events happening around the country, for example events were recently covered in this New York Times article on March 6, Activists Rush to Save Government Science Data — If They Can Find It. #DataRescueWU is an opportunity for programmers, scientists, archivists, activists, and volunteers of all kinds to identify, back-up, and help preserve federal data resources. Special technical expertise is NOT required. Please join us for a few hours or a full day of civic technology and citizen archiving. This event is free and open to the Washington University community and takes place on April 14th from 9am-4:30pm. Registration is now open; please register AM, PM or all day. Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be provided. If you have questions please send them to datarescueWU@gmail.com or ask Ruth [rlewis@wustl.edu].

On Scholarly Communications @ WU Libraries: Scholarly communications selected links from March, 2017, featuring several links from Brian Nosek in case you missed his talks this month.

About the author

Ruth is a librarian at Washington University for biology, math, history of science; she is also scholarly communications coordinator. Email: rlewis@wustl.edu Phone: 314-935-4819