Impact HIV/AIDS Initiative Griot Museum

Washington University Libraries is one of several community partners joining The Griot Museum of Black History on the Impact HIV/AIDS Initiative — an arts and culture community awareness initiative  exploring the ongoing relationship between HIV/AIDS and the St. Louis region’s African-American community.

A Day With(Out) Art Event

The initiative’s first program takes place at The Griot November 30, 2018. Join us for a viewing of the documentary: ALTERNATE ENDINGS, ACTIVIST RISINGS

  • Friday, November 30, 2018 7:00 pm
  • The Griot Museum of Black History, 2505 St. Louis Avenue
  • Suggested donation $5, please RSVP – seating limited

Commissioned by the group Visual AIDSALTERNATE ENDINGS, ACTIVIST RISINGS features “short videos from six inspiring community organizations and collectives” from across the country, focused on how art and activism are intertwined. 

  • The Graphics and Visual Tactics Working Group of ACT UP NY
  • VOCAL (Voices Of Community Activists & Leaders) using music, theater, statistics and more around the issue of homelessness in New York state. 
  • Positive Women’s Network (PWN), a national network for all women, including trans-women. 
  • Visual artists and poets from the 2018 Sero Project, focused on ending HIV criminalization
  • The SPOT advocating for young Black men in Jackson, Mississippi
  • Tacoma Action Collective in Washington state working to #StopErasingBlackPeople from museums

Following the viewing in St. Louis will be a discussion with several local activists and organizers: 

Event information | Printable event flyer

Visual Aids Alternate Endings Activist Rising logo with image of X and red raised fistsVisual AIDS – A Day With(Out) Art

The 2018 Visual AIDS: A Day With(Out) Art project, “seeks to reflect the persisting urgencies of today’s HIV/AIDS epidemic by pointing to pressing political concerns. In their commissioned videos, organizations address intersecting issues including anti-Black violence, HIV criminalization, homelessness, and the disproportionate effects of HIV on marginalized communities. At a moment of growing interest in the histories of AIDS activism, ALTERNATE ENDINGS, ACTIVIST RISINGS foregrounds contemporary engagements between activists, artists, and cultural workers on the front lines.”

In their commissioned videos, organizations address intersecting issues including anti-Black violence, HIV criminalization, homelessness, and the disproportionate effects of HIV on marginalized communities. — Visual AIDS

Created for World AIDS Day 2018, this is the only scheduled screening of ALTERNATE ENDINGS, ACTIVIST RISINGS in St. Louis or Missouri. For a list of other US and International cities, or to arrange a screening see: http://visualaids.org/projects/detail/alternate-endings-activist-risings 

Video Discussion Guide

In support of the videos, Visual AIDS partnered with the group “What Would an HIV Douala Do?” (WWHIVDDD) to create a discussion guide with video synopsis, a glossary, resources to explore more, and discussion questions.  This is guide is available for free online as a PDF.  If you are not sure about attending the viewing, or are unable to join us, looking over this booklet is a great way to gain knowledge over a diverse and emotional topic.

Watching the videos was a reminder that before there was a medical, governmental, or even artistic response to the AIDS crisis, there was a community activist response. — WWHIVDD?

About the Initiative

Impact HIV/AIDS is an arts and culture community awareness initiative led by The Griot Museum of Black History that will use exhibition, storytelling, visual art, mapping, oral history and other forms of expression to explore the ongoing relationship between HIV/AIDS and the St. Louis Region’s African-American community.

The initiative will examine the myths and stereotypes of HIV/AIDS and give witness to the truths of those impacted by the disease. Our goal is to create a powerful and empowering catalyst for change. Areas of discussion will include homelessness, stigma, criminalization, and insurance. Programs will explore the value and significance of knowing one’s status and emphasize the importance of taking preventative measures. It will celebrate people living with HIV/AIDS, remember those who have died, and recognize service providers and care givers.

Get involved!

We hope you will join the conversation as we examine the Impact of HIV/AIDS in our region. Watch for more program announcements for 2019 and beyond.

For more information, or to become involved in supporting the Initiative, email info@thegriotmuseum.com or facebook message @TheGriotTellsOurStory

About the author

Miranda Rectenwald is Curator of Local History, Washington University Special Collections. More info.