Dowd Modern Graphic History Library

Emmett Till: What Were We Seeing Then, What Are We Saying Now?

By l.sylvander on August 9, 2017

October 3, 1955: Life publishes Frank McMahon’s illustrations from the trial of Emmett Till’s murderers. Often considered the full igniting spark of the civil rights movement, Till’s lynching continues to provoke conversations surrounding race relations in the United States toda...

Advertising for Undergarments (1890s-1920s)

By amywang on June 23, 2017

The time around the turn of the 20th century was filled with cultural, social, and technological change. During this period, new technology directed production to large-scale manufacturing. Seeking to self promote, manufacturers branded their products, naturally leading to a need for sales promot...

Animated Filmmaker R.O. Blechman’s Ink Tank Collection Comes to WU

By Jaleen Grove on June 22, 2017

A significant collection of works and documents from the animation studio The Ink Tank, owned and operated by cartoonist and animator R.O. Blechman 1977 – 2004, is finding a permanent home in the D.B. Dowd Modern Graphic History Library at Washington University in St. Louis. The Library specializ...

The Golden Age of Jell-O

By Christina Wang on June 21, 2017

“Jell-O, America’s favorite dessert.” As famously advertised in Ladies’ Home Journal and other women’s magazines as early as 1902, Jell-O was a household favorite in the United States for almost a century. Today, Jell-O is most widely known as a childhood dessert or an alcoholic concoction;...

Whimper: Visual Undercurrents in G. Price’s White Boy

By Calvary on May 31, 2017

Relations between Euro-Americans and American Indians have been regulated by images from the beginning. In his book, The Image of Native Americans in the Pictorial Press, John Coward discusses the formative role of illustration in America’s perception of Indians in the late 19th century, saying t...

Romance Comics: Patterns, Passions, and Problems

By Maddy on May 26, 2017

In a golden era of comics dominated by the superhero and crime genres, the explosion in popularity of a subset surrounding stories of so-called “real-life” love may seem surprising. Nonetheless, romance comics were hugely popular during the post-war and Cold War era from shortly after the genre’s...

Illustrators Legacy Questionnaire

By Skye Lacerte on May 25, 2017

Illustrators, cartoonists, comics creators, and related types of artists: how will your legacy be recorded and preserved? Dr. Jaleen Grove is the DMGHL Postdoctoral Fellow in Popular Print. She researches all facets of illustrators and illustration. As part of her work, she is offering a question...

Modernist Design and the Children’s Magazine

By c.bosch on May 24, 2017

By the middle of the twentieth century, the notion of American periodical publications aimed at a younger readership was already well established. Early versions of children’s magazines appeared in the States as early as the late 1700s, and by the time Humpty Dumpty was launched by Parent’s Magaz...

Drawing Race in 1930’s Collier’s

By Noah on May 22, 2017

In the 1930’s Collier’s magazine represented a popular, progressive viewpoint on American culture. The magazine published articles by Winston Churchill on the significance of the U.S. constitution in the 20th century, as well as profiles skeptical of the rise of the Nazi party in Germany under Hi...

Helen Dryden: Illustrator and Industrial Designer in the Age of Art Deco

By Cathy on May 17, 2017

In the early twentieth century, the covers of the large publications were beautifully illustrated, and many artists who contributed became household names. The art created for fashion magazines in particular stands out. What had started out as representational drawings of clothing and models morp...