Finding-Aid for the John Updike Papers (MSS118)


©2001 University Libraries, Washington University in St. Louis

Department of Special Collections
Olin Library
Campus Box 1061
1 Brookings Drive
St. Louis, MO 63130
(314) 935-5495
Fax: (314) 935-4045
spec@wumail.wustl.edu
http://library.wustl.edu/units/spec


Funding and support for digitization of finding-aids provided by The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation


Table of Contents

Collection Outline

Descriptive Summary

Biographical Note

Scope and Contents Note

Restrictions

Administrative Information


Collection Outline

Series I. Correspondence

Series II. Interviews

Series III. Manuscripts

Return to the Table of Contents


Descriptive Summary

CreatorUpdike, John, 1932-2009
TitleJohn Updike Papers,
Dates: 1965-1968.
Quantity: 10 items
Identification: MSS118

Return to the Table of Contents


Biographical Note

John Hoyer Updike (March 18, 1932 – January 27, 2009) was an American novelist, poet, short story writer, art critic, and literary critic. Updike's most famous work is his Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom series (the novels Rabbit, Run; Rabbit Redux; Rabbit Is Rich; Rabbit At Rest; and the novella "Rabbit Remembered"), which chronicles Rabbit's life over the course of several decades, from young adulthood to his death. Both Rabbit Is Rich (1981) and Rabbit At Rest (1990) received the Pulitzer Prize. Updike is one of only three authors to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction more than once. He published more than twenty novels and more than a dozen short story collections, as well as poetry, art criticism, literary criticism and children's books. Hundreds of his stories, reviews, and poems appeared in The New Yorker, starting in 1954. He also wrote regularly for The New York Review of Books.

He graduated from Shillington High School as co-valedictorian and class president in 1950 and subsequently attended Harvard after receiving a full scholarship. At Harvard, he soon became widely known among his classmates as an extremely talented and prolific contributor to the Harvard Lampoon, of which he served as president, before graduating summa cum laude in 1954 with a degree in English.

After graduation, he decided to become a graphic artist and attended The Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art at the University of Oxford. His early ambition was to be a cartoonist. After returning to the United States, Updike and his family moved to New York, where he became a regular contributor to The New Yorker. This was the beginning of his writing career.

Updike worked in a wide array of genres, including fiction, poetry (most of it compiled in Collected Poems: 1953-1993, 1993), essays (collected in nine separate volumes), a play (Buchanan Dying, 1974), and a memoir (Self-Consciousness, 1989).

Updike won an array of awards, including two Pulitzer Prizes for Fiction, two National Book Awards, three National Book Critics Circle awards, both the 1989 National Medal of Arts and 2003 National Humanities Medal, and the Rea Award for the Short Story for outstanding achievement. The National Endowment for the Humanities selected Updike to present the 2008 Jefferson Lecture, the U.S. government's highest humanities honor; Updike's lecture was entitled "The Clarity of Things: What Is American about American Art."

Updike married Mary E. Pennington, an art student at Radcliffe College, in 1953. The couple had four children together. Updike and Pennington divorced in 1974. In 1977, Updike married Martha Ruggles Bernhard, with whom he lived in Beverly Farms, Massachusetts until his death of lung cancer at a hospice in Danvers, Massachusetts, on January 27, 2009, at the age of 76.

Return to the Table of Contents


Scope and Contents Note

The John Updike Papers consists of materials toward interviews about Updike in Life Magazine (November 4, 1966) and Time Magazine (April 26, 1968) and one poetry drafts by Updike.

Return to the Table of Contents


Restrictions

Access Restrictions

Open.

Use Restriction

None

Users of the collections must read and abide by the Rules for the use of manuscript collection materials.

Users of the collections who wish to use items from this collection, in whole or in part, in any form of publication (as defined in the form) must sign and submit to the Washington University Department of Special Collections a hard copy of the Notification of intent publish manuscript collection materials form.

All publication not covered by fair use restricted to those who have permission of the copyright holder.

Return to the Table of Contents


Administrative Information

Source of Collection

Purchase: Accessions 810, 975, and 998.

Processing Information

Processed by Washington University Department Special Collections Staff, April 1970. EAD encoded finding-aid completed by Sonya McDonald, August 2004.

Accruals

Interfiled within collection or by accession at end of collection.

Return to the Table of Contents


__
Box/folder
1/1

Series I. Correspondence,

__
Box/folder
Updike to Jane Howard explaining the reasons for his extensive revision and correction of her typescript interview with him for Time, Inc. Reports that he will be in New York next week and will be avaiable for questions on his revision., [1966]: October 6 (Typed letter signed. 1 page.)

Return to the Table of Contents




__
Box/folder
1/2

Series II. Interviews,

__
Interview with Updike by Jane Howard, Time, Inc. for Life Magazine, November 4, 1966. Revised and corrected in Updike's hand, many exchanges completely dropped. Red and blue ink., [1966] (Typescript [photocopy]. 10 pages.)
__
Box/folder
1/3
Typescript [photocopy] of background material covering major portions of Updike's childhood, university days, career, working habits, views, etc. based on interviews and research by Time, Inc. bureau correspondents in Boston, Chicago, and London. Most extensive feature by Chris Cory, Boston. Some dispatches have moderate revision., 1968: March 25-26 (Typescript [photocopy]. 84 pages.)
__
Box/folder
1/4
Clipping, Life educational reprint 8, of November 4, 1966 article on Updike and his work, reprinted with similar article on J.D. Salinger, which appeared in November 3, 1961 issue., (1 item)
__
Clipping, Time Magazine article on Updike, 1968: April 26 (1 item)

Return to the Table of Contents




__
Box/folder
1/5

Series III. Manuscripts,

__
Box/folder
The Sensualist [poem], (Typescript, 2 pages. One draft moderate manuscript revision. One draft light manuscript revision.)
Accession 810.

Return to the Table of Contents